The Parrot and the Igloo Notes
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250   An international conference: Heartland Institute, “About the Conference,” ICCC 9. “The Ninth International Conference on Climate Change, which took place on July 7–9, 2014, in Las Vegas, Nevada. . .  .The event was hosted by The Heartland Institute, had 32 cosponsors, and featured 64 keynoters and panelists.”

 

250   the first annual: Anthony Watts, “Prominent Global Warming Skeptic Honored with Frederick Seitz Memorial Award,” Wattupwiththat.com, June 25, 2014.

“Dr. Idso is the first recipient of the Frederick Seitz Memorial Award, an annual award established by former colleagues of one of the world’s best known and most highly respected scientists. Seitz was deeply skeptical of claims that ‘global warming’ is either man-made or dangerous. The award will be presented by atmospheric scientist Dr. S. Fred Singer of the Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP).”

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/06/25/prominent-global-warming-skeptic-honored-with-frederick-seitz-memorial-award/

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

250   “Who could deny”: Oreskes and Conway, Merchants of Doubt, Chapter 5, “What’s Bad Science? Who Decides? The Fight over Secondhand Smoke,” 142.

 

250   “Fred Singer is the most amazing”: Heartland Institute, “Global Warming Skeptics Receive Awards,” June 27, 2014. “Dr. S. Fred Singer, one of the world’s earliest and most credible critics of the theory that global warming is man-made and dangerous, will be recognized with an award for Lifetime Achievement in Climate Science . . . Dr. Singer was among the first and is still the most prominent scientist in the world speaking out against global warming alarmism.”

http://heartland.org/press-releases/2014/06/27/global-warming-skeptics-receive-awards

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

250   “If there’s any person in the the world”: Heartland Institute, “Fred Singer Award—International Conference on Climate Change 9,” July 9, 2014.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZr9TpF2ydQ

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

251   “What can I say?”: ABC News (Dan Harris, Interviewer), Global Warming Denier: Fraud or ‘Realist’? Physicist says don’t worry, humans will benefit from a warmer planet,” March 23, 2008.

 

251   in 1924 Vienna: APCO, To: Philip Morris “Resume, S. Fred Singer: The Science and Environmental Policy Project,” March 18, 1993. Bates Number: 2048902044.

Rachel White Scheuering, Shapers of the Great Debate on Conservation: A Biographical Dictionary, Greenwood Press, 2004. 116.

 

251   Fred Singer fled to England: Anthony Wile, “Fred Singer on the Myths of Politically Correct Science,” The Daily Bell, February 3, 2013.

https://www.thedailybell.com/all-articles/exclusive-interviews/anthony-wile-fred-singer-on-the-myths-of-politically-correct-science/

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

251      He was fourteen: William K. Stevens, The Change In the Weather: People, Weather, and the Science of Climate, Delacorte, 1999. 245.

Also Anthony Wile, “Fred Singer on the Myths of Politically Correct Science."

https://www.thedailybell.com/all-articles/exclusive-interviews/anthony-wile-fred-singer-on-the-myths-of-politically-correct-science/

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

251      “Nobody tells an untruth”: William Booth, “Conference on Global Warming To Seek Agreement on Response,” Washington Post, February 3, 1991.

 

251      High Altitude Research Group: S. Fred Singer, “My Adventures in the Magnetosphere,” 1997.

From The Discovery of the Magnetosphere, History of Geophysics Vol. 7, C. Stewart Gillimor, John R. Spreiter, Eds., American Geophysical Union, 1997. “I started work as a junior physicist at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University (APL) in Silver Spring, Maryland. I had been recruited by James Van Allen to join the High Altitude Research Group, which was planning a series of experiments using captured German V-2 rockets.”

The Applied Physics Laboratory had been established by the Navy at Hopkins in 1942; Van Allen not until 1950. In Georg H. Ludwig, Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology and Scientific Discovery, American Geophysical Union, 2011. 7.

 

251      you arrive at the equator: Rachel White Scheuering, Shapers of the Great Debate on Conservation: A Biographical Dictionary, Greenwood Press, 2004. 116. “For one rocket-launching mission, he accompanied a naval operation on a trip to the Arctic, and he also conducted shipboard rocket launchings at the equator.” It sounds like high-end fun.

 

252      with the scientist James Van Allen: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: Goetz Oertel,” Interviewed by Spencer Weart, April 25, 1978.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/4803

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

252      “I had a choice: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: S. Fred Singer,” Interviewed by Allan A. Needell and David DeVorkin, April 23, 1991.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/28613

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

252      “and come back without any results”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: Goetz Oertel,” Interviewed by Spencer Weart, April 25, 1978.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/4803

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

252      “You know Fred Singer”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: Ernest Krause,” Interviewed by David DeVorkin, August 10, 1982.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/28022

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

252      “Speaking of idiots”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: Adrian Tuck,” Interviewed by Keynyn Bryse, June 24, 2009.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/33573

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

252      “at the tender age of 18”: S. Fred Singer, “My Adventures in the Magnetosphere,” 1997.

 

253      “To be able to say”: Time, “Capturing a Moon and Other Diversions,” February 21, 1969. “That’s the real fun of it all—to be able to say ‘I told you so.’ In science, that’s the name of the game.”

 

253      “You’re Fred and I’m me”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: Philip Mange—Session II,” Interviewed by Ronald Doel and Faye Korsmo, March 25, 2003.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/31144-2

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

253      a self-promoter, a loose cannon: Allan A. Needell, Science, Cold War and the American State, Routledge, 2000. Chapter 12, “IGY Satellites and the Launch of Sputnik.” 326. “Singer came to be viewed by many of his colleagues as something of a self-promoter and loose canon.”

Interestingly, this is the same Allan Needell who interviewed Frederick Seitz—a few notes back, in 1994—and S. Fred Singer. 
https://airandspace.si.edu/people/staff/allan-needell

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

253      “in the air, all over the place”: Matt Bille, Erika Lishook, The First Space Race: Launching the World’s First Satellites, Texas A & M University Press 2004. 47-8.

 

253      “discomfort”: George H. Ludwig, Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology and Scientific Discovery, American Geophysical Union, 2011. 74. “Singer’s implied claim to have originated the idea of a small, instrumented satellite was greeted with discomfort by much of the scientific community.”

 

253      “First, Singer’s manner”: Homer E. Newall, “Beyond The Atmosphere Early Years Of Space Science,” NASA, Scientific and Technical Information Program, 1980.

 

254      “I told you so”: John Lear, “The Facts About the 1962 Space Bomb,” Saturday Review, April 6, 1963.

The magazine reports (painfully, for Singer—he wrote the editor), “While Dr. Van Allen’s name became a household word because of the drama of his work with robot spaceships, Dr. Singer remained known only in a limited circle of physicists and mathematicians.”

 

254      “I never got a NASA contract”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: S. Fred Singer,” Interviewed by Allan A. Needell and David DeVorkin, April 23, 1991.

https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/28613

Accessed 6-22-22.

 

254      “handicapped me most”: American Institute of Physics, “Oral Histories: S. Fred Singer,” Interviewed by Allan A. Needell and David DeVorkin, April 23, 1991.

 

254      It challenges our notions: Singer wrote to the Saturday Review, to discuss the emotional toll, how a scientist can respond to exclusion. “ . . . the very real feeling of frustration of being ‘out’ of important quasi-scientific, quasi-military experiments. Having been both ‘out’ and ‘in,’ I know quite well how this feeling of frustration can develop, particularly when a scientist from the outside believes that an important aspect of a problem has been completely overlooked (as indeed, can and does happen). Contrasted with this is a smugness which sometimes develops among some ‘in’ scientists, based on the feeling that people on the outside could not possibly know all of the details of the problem, and therefore, cannot really contribute. There is a lesson to be learned in this which should be valuable for the future.”

That is, this was an early précis of Singer’s entire career.

S. Fred Singer, “More About The Space Bomb,” Letters To the Science Editor, Saturday Review, May 4, 1963.

The Parrot and the Igloo by David Lipsky